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    Lynn Kim Do

    Lynn Kim Do may be the first fashionista to define and coin the term Neckbreakin’ Style but she is certainly not the only person that this term encompasses. Lynn takes inspiration from the street, from the mundane and thus her extraordinary everyday experiences, and presents it rawly along with visuals and personal style. This is a platform beyond personal style. It is a space of personal experiences. Lynn Do creates a platform that curates her very honest, sometimes too honest, stories called "Street Talk" with style that is also uniquely raw. Having footprints all over the United States, her view of fashion can not be defined by one location or even one style except one - streetwear. She believes in minimal and clean streetwear without losing all the attitude and sass with it. Her visual and production expertise has accumulated many highly recognized repertoire of projects with clients like Revlon and Urban Outfitters. She has been featured on Nylon.com, The New York Times, and WWD to name a few. If you ask her though, her biggest personal achievement is surviving a year lease in a six floor walk-up NYC apartment.

    Abandoned Artist | ft. Johnny Utah


    "I would say, "I am an artist." And people would say, "Cool, what do you do?" I didn't have a quick answer for them. They looked at me with a condescending smirk and labeled me absurd. I just knew I wanted to be able to create. That wasn't good enough. "


    neckbreakin style












    Top - THREADWORKSHOP CO. // Bottom - Urban Outfitters // Sandals - H&M // Jacket - Gifted // Bracelets - Robyn Rhodes, Michael Kors, Vintage

    Before I started in this blogging journey, I dubbed myself an artist. I wasn't sure what kind of artist I was. I didn't fit into any specific artist genre - musician, painter, actor, writer, model, photographer. I envied them because they knew exactly what they were good at. There were classes available, books, whole unions behind them. I would say, "I am an artist." And people would say, "Cool, what do you do?" I didn't have a quick answer for them. They looked at me with a condescending smirk and labeled me absurd. I just knew I wanted to be able to create. That wasn't good enough. Then I came across the book - Letters To a Young Artist by Anna Deavere Smith. It changed my life. She claimed to be an artist of the human condition. Granted she was an actress, a career path I considered. Regardless, I didn't care. I instantly grabbed on to that title. I held on to it desperately. It had guided my hand, my mind, and my will to create. To create emotions. 

    What's great about being an "artist of the human condition" is that this title belonged to many occupations, walk of life, and path. A politician, a lawyer, a janitor, or perhaps a blogger. As long as they were trying to foster empathy creatively. I love working with other artists who create and have an unmeasurable amount of passion to their craft. Johnny Utah is one of them. We spent more than eight hours together working on a separate project (shhh, can't tell you yet!) and went to more locations in Brooklyn than I can remember. His style and vision is very specific. It's gritty and evokes the rising of street in the most stylistic way. We didn't speak too much but I entrusted this talented man with my body as muse. The background spoke just as much as I could ever. 

    The photos speak for themselves.

    Photos by Johnny Utah 



    "I would say, "I am an artist." And people would say, "Cool, what do you do?" I didn't have a quick answer for them. They looked at me with a condescending smirk and labeled me absurd. I just knew I wanted to be able to create. That wasn't good enough. "


    neckbreakin style












    Top - THREADWORKSHOP CO. // Bottom - Urban Outfitters // Sandals - H&M // Jacket - Gifted // Bracelets - Robyn Rhodes, Michael Kors, Vintage

    Before I started in this blogging journey, I dubbed myself an artist. I wasn't sure what kind of artist I was. I didn't fit into any specific artist genre - musician, painter, actor, writer, model, photographer. I envied them because they knew exactly what they were good at. There were classes available, books, whole unions behind them. I would say, "I am an artist." And people would say, "Cool, what do you do?" I didn't have a quick answer for them. They looked at me with a condescending smirk and labeled me absurd. I just knew I wanted to be able to create. That wasn't good enough. Then I came across the book - Letters To a Young Artist by Anna Deavere Smith. It changed my life. She claimed to be an artist of the human condition. Granted she was an actress, a career path I considered. Regardless, I didn't care. I instantly grabbed on to that title. I held on to it desperately. It had guided my hand, my mind, and my will to create. To create emotions. 

    What's great about being an "artist of the human condition" is that this title belonged to many occupations, walk of life, and path. A politician, a lawyer, a janitor, or perhaps a blogger. As long as they were trying to foster empathy creatively. I love working with other artists who create and have an unmeasurable amount of passion to their craft. Johnny Utah is one of them. We spent more than eight hours together working on a separate project (shhh, can't tell you yet!) and went to more locations in Brooklyn than I can remember. His style and vision is very specific. It's gritty and evokes the rising of street in the most stylistic way. We didn't speak too much but I entrusted this talented man with my body as muse. The background spoke just as much as I could ever. 

    The photos speak for themselves.

    Photos by Johnny Utah 


    . October 16, 2014 .