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    Lynn Kim Do

    Lynn Kim Do may be the first fashionista to define and coin the term Neckbreakin’ Style but she is certainly not the only person that this term encompasses. Lynn takes inspiration from the street, from the mundane and thus her extraordinary everyday experiences, and presents it rawly along with visuals and personal style. This is a platform beyond personal style. It is a space of personal experiences. Lynn Do creates a platform that curates her very honest, sometimes too honest, stories called "Street Talk" with style that is also uniquely raw. Having footprints all over the United States, her view of fashion can not be defined by one location or even one style except one - streetwear. She believes in minimal and clean streetwear without losing all the attitude and sass with it. Her visual and production expertise has accumulated many highly recognized repertoire of projects with clients like Revlon and Urban Outfitters. She has been featured on Nylon.com, The New York Times, and WWD to name a few. If you ask her though, her biggest personal achievement is surviving a year lease in a six floor walk-up NYC apartment.

    My Metal Sheet Heart









    When I walk into this installation that is quite literally larger than life itself, it's hard not to be overwhelmed by the stature of these large metal sheets envisioned and created by Richard Serra. I begin to think—How can something so hard and so cold have so much movement? How can it be such a large vessel of emotions?

    It argues that there are many elements that can harden a person up but it doesn’t mean that it takes away the ability to feel, to feel from, and to evoke feelings. In relation to time and history, the movement of the steel reminds us of how solid and permanent our past is. But it is beautiful. Look how beautiful the remarkable warm reds are, the curves etched on to the side, following it in its spiral walls until I reach the core of it all, surrounded, and engulfed in the past I could never run from, but isn’t it all magnificent? I think that’s what Serra wants to convey. He leaves the interpretation open, of course, for the voyageurs and participants to fill up on their own.

    Tee - DIY // Bottom - The Fifth via Fashion Bunker // Air Max 90 - Nike
    Photos by Pedro Morales
    By Lynn Kim Do












    When I walk into this installation that is quite literally larger than life itself, it's hard not to be overwhelmed by the stature of these large metal sheets envisioned and created by Richard Serra. I begin to think—How can something so hard and so cold have so much movement? How can it be such a large vessel of emotions?

    It argues that there are many elements that can harden a person up but it doesn’t mean that it takes away the ability to feel, to feel from, and to evoke feelings. In relation to time and history, the movement of the steel reminds us of how solid and permanent our past is. But it is beautiful. Look how beautiful the remarkable warm reds are, the curves etched on to the side, following it in its spiral walls until I reach the core of it all, surrounded, and engulfed in the past I could never run from, but isn’t it all magnificent? I think that’s what Serra wants to convey. He leaves the interpretation open, of course, for the voyageurs and participants to fill up on their own.

    Tee - DIY // Bottom - The Fifth via Fashion Bunker // Air Max 90 - Nike
    Photos by Pedro Morales
    By Lynn Kim Do




    . August 26, 2016 .